Author: zoalicious1

Writer, traveler, finger-painter, pun dappler.

What’s Hidden JRNL102

This audio slideshow delves into the life and passions of Anne Ridgway. Anne is a practising sound therapist in the lower Blue Mountains, her focus being on improving the health and well-being of her clients though her use of sound tools. Sound therapy concentrates on the power of reverberations upon the body, to detect physical and emotional imbalances within others. As the treatment is unseen by the naked eye, many remain skeptical of this alternative medicine and the chakra system it is founded upon. Alison Babbage, however, gave a convinced testimonial to Anne’s practice and how it had improved her quality of life.

This project tested me in numerous ways, in particular is Alison’s interview not going to plan, realising soon after than my phone’s microphone had broken. Although a stressful process, having probably need a sound session for myself, I was pushed to find the next best alternative and as a result learnt more about the various elements involved in using imovie.

However, the most important things I learnt was from the open minded attitude of Anne. She was by no means preaching sound therapy as superseding conventional medicines. She acknowledged that there are health issues where medication is more suitable than her treatments, however proposing that sound therapy’s lack of credibility to the western eye lies in the energy’s inability to be medically tested. Her reasoning shed light on the controversial issue, and our heavy reliance on visibility to believe in the power of something.

Having attended a session with Anne, there was an unmistakable power in the sounds she played to my body, and a change in the quality of sound as the tools revealed hidden blockages, both physical and emotional. Alison related to this experience, as it had brought her to very deep states of meditation in the past. These moments of bliss revealed habitual thoughts, emotions and tensions in myself that would have otherwise gone unnoticed in the busy-ness of life. Anne’s sound therapy enacted as a healthy reminder to stop every now and then and listen to what is hidden within yourself. By watching the video below you will get a taste of what Anne’s practice is all about:

And here are the storified tweets that documented the process:

Creature of the Night Review

My favourite story from the previous cohort of JRNL102 was ‘Creature of the Night’, proving to be strong and effective despite the word count on the talent’s part. This drives home the point that sometimes less is more. The story had a strong narrative arch, where listeners were intrigued to find out what kind of night shift the talent took. The use of ambient, rain-like noise makes this even more mysterious. I was satisfied at the end when finding out that he worked for McDonald’s, immediately challenging the unfamiliar night shift that I had in mind. On re-listening I gained something new in learning the effective ‘rain noise’ was that of food being fried.

The rhythm in sound, the lonely harmonica and dialogue worked in harmony to create the character of an isolated night-shift worker. This is achieved, funnily enough, by somewhat isolating each sound element from each other. Of course these elements are layout but they simultaneously feel spaced apart. In particular to harmonica sounds is often affiliated with a sense of a ghost-town and loneliness, emphasising this element of the talent whist adding a gripping mystery.

You can listen to it here: https://soundcloud.com/jl_osborne/creature-of-the-night

A Smooth Path

Amy’s relationship to place is unique but not unheard of. Due to a trauma at birth, Amy was born with cerebral palsy, a neurological condition that affects her ability to control her muscles, namely those in her legs. From a young age, Amy has used a wheelchair as her main mode of day-to-day transportation. She is currently studying out of home at UOW, soon to major in politics. Although her lifestyle is an independent one, there are still difficulties in relating the Wollongong through a wheelchair. Amy enlightens us on those daily challenges that many wouldn’t consider otherwise.

A Smooth Path

Amy’s relationship to place is unique but not unheard of. Due to a trauma at birth, Amy was born with cerebral palsy, a neurological condition that affects her ability to control her muscles, namely those in her legs. From a young age, Amy has used a wheelchair as her main mode of day-to-day transportation. She is currently studying out of home at UOW, soon to major in politics. Although her lifestyle is an independent one, there are still difficulties in relating the Wollongong through a wheelchair. Amy enlightens us on those daily challenges that many wouldn’t consider otherwise. Attached is the link to her audio story:

Reflections on the Task

Two of the main reasons that I chose to interview my friend was because of her unique relation to place and interesting character. Being a good friend of mine, I know my subject as a funny, down-to-earth and entertaining character. If anyone were to follow them on snapchat you would know that they always have a story to tell. The second reason as to why I chose them link directly back to the theme of piece, as my subject has cerebral palsy, thus having to relate to space through their wheelchair. Not only did I see the important issues that could surface from this interview, but also the potential for an interesting soundscape.

The natural tone and rhythm of my subject’s voice inclines me to forgo having any musical tracks, and rather take a minimalistic approach to sound effects that will familiarise audiences with their story. For the vast majority of listeners are likely to not require the use of a wheelchair, this point is especially important. Something as small as the sound of a wheel going over a bump adds character to my subject’s mode of transportation. Furthermore, this will emphasise the issue of poor infrastructure that is evident in Wollongong.

Music in the Dark

.In this piece, I aimed to capture my talent, Jake Parker, and his love for music. Often times he is found practical his saxophone in the dark sanctuary of his room. Due to the given musical affiliation of this space, the challenge of portraying ti through sound did not present itself. However, showing darkness in sound is hard to achieve and in hindsight I would have include a light switch noise in the beginning. Nevertheless, here is my first go at using Hindenburg:

50 Spheres of Grey

Earlier this year, the upcoming erotic-drama 50 Shades of Grey was released in cinemas world-wide. Based on E. L. James’s best-seller, the movie adaptation has rippled waves of discussion throughout multiple mediated public spheres. For Fifty Shades had effectively introduced a taboo genre, erotica literature, into the turbulent debates that define mediated public spheres.

Huffington Post Journalist, Jessica Goodman’s article “Why Doesn’t ‘Fifty Shades Of Grey’ Show Ana Having An Orgasm?” described the 50 Shades phenomenon as having “made erotic literature acceptable to read on the subway or in a book club.” Moreover, it has generated countless discussions over internet forums and mediated television articles. This has brought public attention to contentious issues around BDSM representations, a topic that was once too taboo to even enter the public sphere.

In Goodman’s article, there is a focus on the lack of the female orgasm in the movie, and how it has nevertheless been given a high rating for “strong sexual content.” She went on to argue that this caused a discrepancy between the book, which delves into the Ana’s sexual gratification to target a female audience. This triggered an extensive list of mediated online comments, one of which by Annie Rubanis noted that the movie was about a relationship of abuse and “how her orgasm is hardly on his list of goals”. This was responded to by Christian Aragon whom disagrees in believing that 50 Shades’ filmatic orgasm representation was on point. They wrote: “withholding that pinnacle of pleasure is a common trait with subs and doms. It’s part of the play.” Meanwhile other commenters merely dropped lines that spoke for themselves, Bill Bill simply stating “Fifty shades of soft porn.” These are only a few of the countless responses to one online article on the film, demonstrating how Fifty Shades sparked an eruption of debate in the public sphere of online commenting.

Another example of a public sphere inundated with public opinion on the film is that of the newsroom. A good example can be seen in the story covered by WAPT News Jackson, which honed in on a localised pubic sphere’s response to the film, the local sphere being none other than Mississippi. The article concerned itself with how the state was defying its polls of “being the most conservative state in the country” in purchasing four times as many presales than expected for fifty shades. Vox pops of Mississippians entering the cinema captured their responses to the film, some of which being “just because you watch a certain movie doesn’t mean that you live your life that way” to that of “Southern bellies like to have fun too”. Opinions of more notable names were also mediated by the article, such as Wesley biblical Seminary Professor Matt Friedeman. “Well, I can’t be a fan of abusing women. I can’t be a fan of hitting women,” he said. “I can’t be a fan of putting handcuffs on women sexually. It’s just not a typical Mississippian act.” An even stronger reaction were provoked by Pastor Dwayne Pickett of New Jerusalem Church. “The things that entertain us are typically things that are the racy things that are on the edge or just downright sin,” Pickett said. This array of reactions and opinions provoked by 50 Shades of Grey goes to show the diverse and controversial impact that it had on the public sphere.